The Haunting is OUT in Ebook and Audiobook

My paranormal romance, The Haunting is out in ebook and audiobook with Scribd! Read or listen to the book for free when you sign up for a 30-day free trial.

Set in my former home of Frederickburg, VA, The Haunting is a steamy, second-chance-at-love story — my very favorite kind. Framed for treason by his nemesis, Union army captain Ethan O’Malley is hanged in 1862. Even as he walks toward the Eternal Light, Ethan vows to wait for his beloved Isabel on the Other Side.

Flash forward to present day. American History professor, Dr. Maggie Holliday moves into her dream home in the Fredericksburg Historic District and discovers the diary of Isabel Earnshaw while cleaning the attic. Reading of Isabel’s breathless encounters with a certain dashing Union army captain, Maggie begins to feel as if she’s not reading a stranger’s words but her own. Searching for answers, she encounters a sexy Civil War reenactor squatting in her attic, who insists she’s his Isabel. And that he’s “her” Ethan.

Can these star-crossed lovers find their way back to one another before the portal to the past closes, this time forever?

The inspo for The Haunting, its twisty ending especially, is the film, “Somewhere in Time” with Jane Seymour and Christopher Reeve, a comfort watch I still go back to. The notion that time isn’t linear but layered, more like an onion than a straight line, has always fascinated me. And of course that true love is truly timeless appeals to my incurably romantic heart.

Another reason I so love The Haunting is that my real-life Maine Coon kitty, Willie, appears as Maggie’s (and Isabel’s) beloved fur child. Because, you know, soulmates don’t have to be only two-legged. Willie passed over the Rainbow Bridge in 2014, but he lives on in our hearts–and in these pages.

Enjoy The Haunting and my other books, too. Find my complete book list here.

Hope

#TBT Interview with Julia Quinn

This interview with historical romance bestseller Julia Quinn was originally published in RT BOOK Reviews magazine (print edition) as “Sitting Down with Julia Quinn.” An abridged version appears below. Enjoy and happy #TBT!

Interview with Historical Romance Author Julia Quinn

I recently chatted up bestselling historical romance novelist and triple RITA® Award winner, Julia Quinn. Here’s what she had to say about globetrotting on the cheap, the unexpected inspiration of really bad music, and why Happily Ever After really is the best way to go in real life as well as fiction.

Infrequently Known JQ Facts

HCT: You sat down to write your first romance novel when you were a college senior at Harvard and went on to publish your first few novels when you were going back-and-forth in your head about pursuing medical school. Less well known is that in the early ‘90s you worked as a writer and researcher for Let’s Go: Europe. That must have been a fun job. Can you tell us a bit about that?

JQ: It was a terrific job, but I don’t think I’d describe it as fun.  Let’s Go: Europe is designed for the budget traveler, so to make sure it contains the most relevant information, researcher/writers are dispatched on strict budgets.  I was given airfare and $32 a day to survive on Crete and Cyprus.  Trust me when I tell you that $32 a day did not go far even in 1990.  I stayed in many youth hostels, survived an infestation of fleas and was propositioned by a monk.

But on the other hand, I learned a tremendous amount about resourcefulness and resilience.  It was the first time I’d ever spent more than a week in a non-English-speaking country (most important words in Greek: “Oil,” “Vinegar,” and “Boyfriend in America”), and this was pre-Internet, pre-cell phone.  I was truly separated from my friends and family.  If I wanted to call home, I had to find a hotel that didn’t charge exorbitant rates and get them to place an international call for me, which might or might not go through.

1990 was also pre-laptop, so I had to do all of my writing and editing by hand.  I traveled with a copy of the previous year’s books (both Let’s Go: Europe and Let’s Go: Greece & Turkey), several 8.5 x 11 notebooks, carbon paper, scissors, and a glue stick.  Anything I wanted to keep from the previous edition I had to cut carefully from its pages and glue-stick it into the notebook.  New stuff I wrote by hand.  Oh, and I had to use carbon paper so that I had copies in case my writing got lost in the mail. I’m not sure what we would have done if that had actually happened. The carbon copies were missing all of my glued-in bits. I have a feeling current researcher writers have it a lot easier.

HCT: You were the first romance writer to ever do a book signing at the Borders in Singapore. What does it feel like to meet fans of your books in a culture so different from the U.S. but also from the U.K. where your historical romances are set? Is the language of love and love stories truly universal? Are there any differences, cultural or other, that stand out in memory?

JQ: I visited Singapore in 1999 before my career had really taken off, so I don’t know if I actually had any fans there before my signing!  Mostly I remember how grateful everyone was that an American author had taken the time to visit their country and do a book signing.  I would love to do more international signings.  I have a very active Facebook Fan Page, and I’m constantly amazed at how international my readership is.  Sadly, I have not yet managed to convince my publishers that I need to be sent on a world tour. 😉

What’s Next in Historical Romance for JQ?

HCT: You recently contributed to a three-part novel, The Lady Most Likely, with fellow bestselling romance authors, Eloisa James and Connie Brockway. How did the project come about? What process did you three follow for brainstorming, plotting out, and finally writing and editing the work? Were there any ahem…clashes?

JQ: No clashes!  I think there might have been one time where we argued over comma usage, but that’s it.

The project came about during a conversation Eloisa and I were having about anthologies.  We both love writing in the novella format, but several readers had told us that they found novellas to be too brief.  Eloisa came up with the idea of integrating three love stories into one longer, cohesive novel.  We asked Connie to join in because we’re both such big fans of her writing.

We had a terrific time putting the project together.  We had a very brief three-paragraph description of the plot when we sold the book, but that was it, so we met for a long weekend in New Orleans to work out the plot and characters.  Then there was quite a bit of emailing that went back and forth.  We had such a good time with it that we’re already planning another!

HCT: Your latest release, Just Like Heaven, went on sale May 31st. This is the start of yet another new series for you, the Smythe-Smith Quartet. Can you tell us a bit about who we’ll meet as the hero and heroine in the book and about the series overall?

JQ: Years ago I wrote a scene in which my hero and heroine found themselves at the worst musical concert known to man.  It was the annual Smythe-Smith Musicale, during which Mozart was butchered so badly it was a wonder he didn’t rise up from his grave in agony.  I had so much fun with the scene that I found myself bringing back the Smythe-Smiths in later books.  I figured it was an annual event—there was no reason my other heroes and heroines couldn’t be forced to sit through bad music.

But there was always one girl up on the stage who seemed to understand just how bad the quartet really was. Readers begged me to tell her story.  So of course I decided to write one for one of the other girls—Honoria Smythe-Smith, who smiled widely during the concert as she attacked her violin. It turns out she is very much not in love with Marcus Holyroyd, her brother’s best friend since childhood.  And Marcus is definitely not in love with her.

That’s when the fun begins.

But for those of you wanting the story of the girl who actually can play music, have no fear—it’s coming.  Since there are four musical spots in a quartet, I decided to write a quartet of books.

HCT: More so than a rapport, you really seem to have a relationship with your readers. Offering up the epilogues to your Bridgerton books—second epilogues, even—as e-downloads seems to underscore the reciprocity of that loyalty. Most authors write sequels or novellas in anthologies, not 30 page epilogues. How did you first come up with this innovative idea? Any update on when the publisher, Avon/ HarperCollins, will be issuing the compilation of the eight epilogues into a print volume?

JQ: The 2nd Epilogues came about because so many readers were contacting me and asking, “What happened next?”  And all I could answer was, “I don’t know.”  The great thing about writing romance is that it ends rather neatly.  The main characters fall in love and we all know that they will live happily ever after.  So when I finish a book, I don’t really think about what happens to my characters unless I have some compelling reason to do so—usually if they are going to make an appearance as secondary characters in another book.

After I’d said, “I don’t know,” about a hundred times, I started thinking—if I were to offer updates on the characters, how would I do it?  I came up with the idea of “2nd Epilogues,” which are essentially short stories that take place sometime after the novel ends.  The novel is absolutely 100 percent complete without these 2nd Epilogues; rather, they are extras or treats if you will, for my most devoted readers.

Right now the 2nd Epilogues are only available as electronic downloads, but we do plan to release them in a print collection, hopefully at the end of 2011.

Final Thoughts

HCT:  Have you ever had a Fan Girl Moment with another Big Name Author? You know, one of those tongue tying, almost pants’ peeing moments of sheer, awestruck delight?

JQ: I do remember being terrified to meet Lisa Kleypas very early on in my career.  I was such a fan of her work. I think I’d read Then Came You and Dreaming of You a hundred times each.  Now it seems ludicrous to have been so scared.  Lisa is quite possibly the nicest, most approachable, and generous person I’ve ever met.  But hey, I didn’t know that then!

HCT: Your undergraduate degree is in Art History and you were accepted into Yale School of Medicine and Columbia College of Physicians & Surgeons. Quelle choice! You’ve been a researcher/reporter for a well–known travel magazine and have traveled widely both personally and professionally. Oh, and you’ve written a bunch o’ bestselling books, including your famous Bridgerton series, beloved the world over. On the personal front, you’ve been married to your personal Prince Charming since 1996. To stave off the rest of us from spiraling into existential insecurity, tell us, JQ, is there anything you can’t do really well that you wish you could? Even better, is there anything you positively suck at?

JQ: I can’t turn a cartwheel.  I cannot tell you how much emotional anguish this has caused me.  (And lest you think I’m being sarcastic, ask any fourth-grade girl!  Cartwheels are a necessity!) I actually decided that I was going to learn how to cartwheel for my 40th birthday.  It seemed like one of those awesome, I-Am-Woman-I-Can-Do-Anything things that are perfect for milestones.

Didn’t happen.

HCT: I adore the tagline used throughout your web site: Because happily ever after is a whole lot of fun. It feels like a philosophy of life as much as a branding device. And it certainly fits with your books which even for romances stand out as so sunshiny and upbeat, as well as meticulously well-researched and, for want of a better word, smart, that reading one is like biting into a crisp autumn apple—good all the way through. The first JQ book I read was The Viscount Who Loved Me and I still remember that after I finished my face hurt from so much smiling. Have you always subscribed to happily ever after is a whole lot of fun? Or is this something you’ve come to over time? Feel free to borrow Lady Whistledown’s infamous quill and give us some pithy commentary or better yet, advice.

JQ: I’ve never been attracted to bad boys.  I just don’t think love should be hard.  Life throws you enough curve balls—illness, money woes, freak accidents—love should be the easy part in all of this.  It should be thing that gets you through all the other stuff.  I married my best friend, and it sure has made my happily ever after a lot of fun.

HCT: Your website at JuliaQuinn.com is so cool and comprehensive. It covers everything to do with your books, which are listed by series and title, your news & events, the charities you favor (love that!), and your roster of not only the foreign language editions of your books but also your personal overseas travels. Can you tell us one thing, PG-13, of course, that isn’t there?

JQ: It all comes back to that lecherous monk… 😉

The Duke and I, historical romance by Julia Quinn

Stinky Boots – Hygiene and Hot Sex in Historical Fiction

Getting Down and Dirty in Historical Fiction

Chamber pots, head lice, the pox—and I don’t mean the kind prefaced by “chicken”—writing historical fiction, especially romantic historical fiction, calls for striking a balance between authenticity and contemporary sensibilities. I still recall, with lingering discomfort, watching Braveheart for the first time. Spending nearly three hours with Mel Gibson’s William Wallace and his men blanketed in sweat, blood, and woad was nearly as excruciating for me as the final execution scene.

In PBS’s Sanditon, adapted from Jane Austen’s unfinished novel set in an upstart coastal resort striving to be the next Brighton, Sidney Parker (Theo James) opts for a refreshing — and unencumbered — solo sea bath, emerging from the cleansing froth just as Charlotte Heywood (Rose Williams) trots up. The birthday suit booty comes early on in episode two, which surely would send Miss Austen clutching her pearls. Or, more properly, turning in her tomb.

Sanditon, PBS.org

Getting Wet

In Medieval times, providing a bath was part and parcel of the hospitality on offer to visiting knights and other honored male guests. The ritual was performed in private and hands-on by the chatelaine of the castle—talk about your potentially sexy novel scenario!

England’s Queen Elizabeth I couldn’t abide malodors from her courtiers or herself. Her commitment to cleanliness called for hauling her private bath on every stop of every Royal Progress.

But what about everyone else, those whose social station fell somewhere between lordly and lowly?

Making an indoor bath happen was a time-consuming labor. Water was brought in from an outside well, heated in the kitchen, and then carried in heavy, copper-lined buckets up flights of often steep, winding stairs. But there were alternatives. The remains of hot rocks baths, communal bathing pools lined with smooth stone and sometimes roofed against inclement weather, have been excavated throughout Scotland and parts of Ireland. Some sites were proximate to naturally occurring thermal springs, but others were not. In the latter case, buckets of heated stones or rocks were periodically added to the water, maintaining a semi-constant warmish temperature. Quelle steamy story setup for an historical romance writer!

Regency rake and original male fashionista, Beau Brummell is known as much for bringing fastidiousness into vogue as he is for his elaborate snowy waterfall neck cloth and champagne-based boot blacking. We have Brummell to thank for bringing regular bathing to the in crowd.

Toothsome Tales

Medieval people also took regular care of their teeth, and I don’t only mean visiting the blacksmith or other local tooth puller once things got… ugly. Tooth powders were the precursors to Crest and Colgate. Certain wood barks were ideal for cleaning between teeth. Chewing fennel and other breath-freshening seeds was a common practice between and after meals—early Altoids! Recipes for soaps and bath salts were passed down from mother to daughter.

Getting Physical

By the late 1990’s and early aughts, historical romances began embracing grittier, less airbrushed depictions of hygiene and intimacy. Take, for example, Outlander by Diana Gabaldon, the launch to her brilliant and beloved Scottish time travel series. During Jamie and Claire’s wedding night lovemaking, his curious kisses stray… south. The usually randy Claire halts him, protesting that he must be put off by her unwashed state. Smiling, Jamie likens the situation to a horse learning his mare’s scent. And proceeds to prove how very not put off he is.

We don’t call them “heroes” for nothing. 😉

Outlander, Starz

By now most of us are familiar with the infamous tampon scene in Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James. In historical romances, our heroines rarely have their periods until they don’t and then only in the service of the story, notably advancing the tried-and-true “marriage of convenience” trope. Rarely do we see in fiction what dealing with menstruation must have meant for our foremothers. Plug-like devices for blocking flow are traceable to ancient Egypt (papyrus) and Rome (wool). The modern, mass-produced tampon wasn’t invented until 1929. Patented in 1931 by creator Dr. Earle Haas, this remarkably liberating new product was later trademarked “Tampax.”

Such advances are all well and good but what about having the personal space to put them into practice? Not even gentlewoman Jane Austen had a room of her own. In Irish Eyes, my women’s historical fiction debut (on submission), my Irish immigrant heroine shares a three-room Lower East Side, New York tenement flat with a family of seven. Finding the privacy to change clothes, bathe, relieve herself and manage menstruation as she must is a challenge few of us can imagine facing. Yet as documented by turn-of-the-century reformer, Jacob Riis in How The Other Half Lives, those were the very circumstances in which the vast majority of immigrant arrivals to New York found themselves.

Jacob Riis

Historical fiction fans are an exceptionally savvy lot. Anachronisms invariably jar us from the story; too many may well have us pulling the plug without reaching the end. And yet none of us truly knows what it was to live in a previous century or, for that matter, generation. We conduct our research in the service of the story. Fortunately, romantic historical fiction focuses not on the ordinary but on the extraordinary. Not on tepid tenderness but on grand passion and great stakes. Not on how dark, dreary and dirty life can be but on how amazing real love is and always will be.

PBS's Sandition, based on Jane Austen's unfinished historical fiction novel
PBS.org

An earlier version of this article appeared in Heroes & Heartbreakers.

Copyright Hope C. Tarr

Read the first chapter of Tempting, my award-winning Victorian-set historical here, then get the book on Amazon and elsewhere for #99cents.

Twitter @hopetarr Instagram @hopectarr

 

GIVEAWAY! More Free Books!

ClaimedByTheRogue_Cvr w Quote_300dpiAnd the winners are… Robin Greene, Diane Sallans, Deb Yates, Desiree Cleary, Aileen Davis, Juanita Decuir, Marie Woodfolk, Kelly Braun, Mary Kay Gaunt & Joy Isley! Thanks to all who entered. Please check back here at HopeTarr.com for updates on giveaways, new book projects and the the general latest good news. Happy Summer/Happy Reading! Hope

Enter my new Giveaway and you may win a FREE trade paperback copy of my latest historical romance, CLAIMED BY BY THE ROGUE signed by me! (1 book per winner; open to US residents only).  Early fans of my romance debut, A ROGUE’S PLEASURE, this is your chance to FINALLY find out what happens to Robert and Phoebe, that impromptu coupling of unlikely young lovers from book #1.

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Happy Mother’s Day Month,
Hope

Get CLAIMED BY THE ROGUE for 99 Cents & Win a Gift Basket, Gift Card + More!

Hope_Gift BasketClaimedByTheRogue_Cvr w Quote_300dpiCLAIMED BY THE ROGUE, my first single title historical romance since 2008, releases in print on 3-3-15! Between now and Release Day, we’re offering the e-book for just 99 cents across the following platforms:

Kindle
Nook
iBooks
Kobo
Google Play
Samhain Store

But, there’s more…

Help me keep the party going now through Release Week and enter the Giveaway below (Rafflecopter Entry Form at the end of this post). We’ll have twelve winners in total–and one of them may be YOU!

Grand Prize: Gift basket of pamper-you goodies (love poems, candle, votive, and of course, chocolate!) PLUS, signed-by-me hard cover copies of m/our erotic romances, SUGAR and HONEY–think Fifty Shades of Grey with grownups–the TEMPTING audiobook and the SCRIBBLING WOMEN anthology (28 romance authors including Yours Truly dishing on our Real-Life Love Stories, for charity).

Amazon Gift Card ImgAmazon Gift CardSecond Prize: $25 Amazon Gift Card (one winner)

Third Prize(s):  Autographed copy of SUGAR or HONEY, one book per winner; 10 individual winners.

 

 

 

 

To enter:

 

The more times you enter, the more chances you have to win!

Giveaway ends 3/6/15. Entries limited to US residents only.

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Last Day to Get TEMPTING for FREE! Plus, Never Before Released Excerpt!

Ever After Romance LogoTEMPTING_New Cvr_Pink Pearls_Final_12-9-11

 

Today (2/9) is your LAST DAY to get my Victorian set historical, TEMPTING for FREE, and I don’t want any of you, my dear readers, to miss out, especially when it’s all so perfectly simple and refreshingly easy. Download the awesome–and also #FREE–EverAfter Romance ebook app: http://bit.ly/12jLGry (iOS) & http://bit.ly/1wNJT9t (Android). In less than a minute, the book will appear on your shelf.

Already have the app? Even better, just enter Code: htfree

Still need help deciding? Enjoy this never before released snippet from TEMPTING.

 

Hope reading TEMPTING_2-2-15
Reading TEMPTING at Lady Jane’s Salon® on 2-2-15.

TEMPTING, © Hope Tarr, That Book, Inc.

Simon paced from one end of the fringed foyer runner to the other, white-gloved hands folded behind him. Piles of paperwork awaited him on his desk and yet with time on his hands still he hadn’t managed to make heads or tails of any of it. A soft sound stalled his steps. Expecting Mrs. Griffith or one of the housemaids, he looked to the staircase. And saw Christine.

          Garbed in a gown of saffron silk, her hair swept up into an intricate confection of ringlets, her bared shoulders held back to reveal every proud inch of her lithe frame, she graced him with a soft smile. “Simon.”

          Descending, she seemed more fantasy than flesh-and-blood, an exquisite angel floating toward him despite the hint of a hitch to her step. The hall was chilly but, inside him, heat spiked. Like a sleepwalker, he felt himself moving toward her, every glib greeting and clichéd compliment fleeing his brain. Only one word remained.    

          “Christine.”

          She stepped off the landing, and he reached up to take her hand in his. “I’m not late, am I?”

          That made him smile. Despite her finery, she was so unspoiled, so… dear. “To be truly fashionable, you should have kept me waiting for at least a half hour.” Realizing he still held onto her hand, he released it with regret.

          Her smile dimmed. “Oh dear, I’ve gone about it all wrong again, haven’t I?”

          Her words touched off the tenderness in his heart. “No, I’m glad you’re here.” He took the cape from her and hung it upon the hall tree. Turning back, he said, “I have a present for you.”

          He led her over to the pier glass. Stepping behind her, he caught his first glimpse of her gown’s low back. All that beautiful bareness had him searching for his next breath.

          Finding it, he said, “Close your eyes.”

          She obeyed, and he reached into the inner pocket of his cutaway jacket and withdrew the black velvet box. “No peeking,” he chided, seeing her eyelid flicker. He snapped open the box. Withdrawing the necklace, he brought the gold chain about her throat.

          “It’s cold.” She reached up, her fingertips brushing the pendant dangling just above the swell of her breasts.

          “It was a long and rather bracing ride back from town,” he admitted.

          “Your business was to buy me a gift?” Eyes still closed, she leaned back ever so slightly against him.

          “It was.” He fumbled but finally fastened the clasp. He lingered a moment more, inhaling her sweet, clean scent, then stepped back. “Open your eyes.”

          She did, and their gazes met in the mirror. She looked down at the necklace and uttered an exclamation of delight. “Oh, Simon, it’s fair near the same color as my gown. How did you know?”

          “My spies are everywhere.” He winked, feeling light and young and altogether freer than he had in years, quite possibly ever. That the pendant complemented her gown was pure happenstance. He’d bought the amber because the color made him think of her eyes, eyes capable of capturing men’s hearts with a single, liquid look. “Do you like it?”

          She whisked about to face him. “It’s the loveliest gift I’ve ever gotten.”

          You’re the loveliest thing I’ve ever seen, he thought but didn’t dare say.

          “I’m glad,” he said, both happy and humbled that his token had made her so happy.

          She took a step back. “Do I look—” She faltered, brow furrowed, likely searching for one of the long, elegant words she shored up for such occasions. “Do I look…ravished?”

          Accustomed as he’d become to the artful simpering of society beauties, Christine’s guilelessness was akin to being handed a glass of iced lemonade after hours of sun baked toil. Refreshing, delicious, sweet—and yet tartly tempting.

          Pressing a hand to the small of her back, he felt her shiver against his fingertips. “Not yet…but then the evening is young.”

                 ~~~ ~~~  

 

 

Release Day! CLAIMED BY THE ROGUE + Giveaway

It’s Release Day for CLAIMED BY THE ROGUE, and this is a special-to-me day indeed for several reasons.

ClaimedByTheRogue_Cvr w Quote_300dpiFirst, CLAIMED BY THE ROGUE is my first single-title historical since I concluded my Men of Roxbury House trilogy in 2008.

Originally conceived as the sequel to my very first book, A ROGUE’S PLEASURE, originally published in 2000 by Berkley/Jove and now available as a digital book from Harlequin’s Carina Press.

CLAIMED BY THE ROGUE picks up six years later, in 1820. Lady Phoebe Tremont and (now) Captain Robert Bellamy finally have their opportunity at Happily Ever After. Only the course of true love rarely runs smoothly, not even in romance! The couple have several steep obstacles to surmount including a six year separation during which Robert was believed to have been drowned at sea.

rogue_276The book has a superbly beautiful cover thanks to the talented folks at Samhain Publishing. And gracing that cover is a phenomenally flattering quote from the insanely talented Anna Campbell.

Is it any wonder I feel like celebrating!?!

To that end, between today (3-4-14) and the end of the month (3-31-14), I will give away one e-book copy of my Victorian set romance,TEMPTING to everyone who purchases a copy of CLAIMED BY THE ROGUE anywhere online.

To receive your FREE copy, post your proof of purchase HERE, to THIS POST, and I will email you TEMPTING. (Offer limited to 1 book per individual).

It’s my way of saying thank you for all your support over the past 14 years–and almost 25 books. 🙂

TEMPTING_New Cvr_Pink Pearls_Final_12-9-11Huzzah to Happily Ever After!

Hope

 

 

More Cover Reveal Goodness: Enslaved Published in France!

Well, folks, this has been QUITE the Fabulous Friday (#FF) for me as well as an altogether unforgettable #BEA13.

Mere minutes ago, I found out that ENSLAVED, Book #2 of my beloved Men of Roxbury House Victorian-set trilogy, is officially out in France as ESCLAVE DE SES CHARMES.

Once again, my wonderful French publisher, J’ai Lu (a division of Flammarion) has outdone itself with a cover that is beyond beautiful–exquisite! But don’t take my word for it, see below. 🙂

Lastly, the original English version of ENSLAVED is still available in print and e-book. Check out the book excerpt and ordering info here.

9782290038246_cbenslaved_350

 

 

 

 

Book Trailer! VANQUISHED & The Men of Roxbury House Go to Spain!

As some of you may remember, VANQUISHED (Book #1 in my Men of Roxbury House trilogy) is being published in Spain. Translated into Spanish and given a gorgeous new cover, the book is now on sale. Check out the super short–two minutes!–book trailer by my fabulous Spanish publisher, Libros de Seda.

VANQUISHED and my other Men of Roxbury House Victorian-set romances, originally published with Medallion Media Group, are also available in French and Italian. As they say, it’s a small world. I am beyond thrilled to be able to share these beloved books with romance readers around the globe.

A ROGUE’S PLEASURE Wins LASR Best Book Award!

Sometimes life is filled with delightful, seemingly random surprises. Coming into our second week of a new year, I’m happy to report that so far 2011 does not disappoint. This weekend I learned that A Rogue’s Pleasure, my Regency set historical romance debut reissued this summer with Carina Press, was up for a Best Book Award at Long and Short Reviews along with several other books, including those by some pretty powerhouse authors. How lovely!

Even lovelier, I logged online this morning to find that I’d won!

In lieu of lapsing into a full Sally Field (i.e., “You like me. You really like me!”) I’ll sign off now with heartfelt thanks to LASR and to all of you who took the time this weekend to share the love and vote for me. Without further “ado,” below is the lovely book trailer video created as part of my contest prize.

Hope